So Small a Beginning: Part 1

Sr Marie Foale speaks about the beginnings of the Institute of St Joseph for the Catholic education of poor children.

She believes that as a young Josephite growing up, she had a sense that one day Mary MacKillop and Julian Tenison Woods had made a spontaneous decision to found an order.

You’re invited to watch the first part of Sr Marie’s conference speech, ‘So Small a Beginning’ below…

Part 1

View the whole conference speech here

Julian Tenison Woods: A Life – Chapter 4th

Chapter 4th

Soon after his arrival in Hobart, Mr Woods found circumstances quite different to his expectations… Though he remained only a few months in Hobart, his amiable conduct and fervent piety made a lasting impression on many persons…Mary MacKillop
Mary MacKillop, 1871

…Julian – after staying a short while in Victoria – went to Adelaide to join his brother, Mr J.D. Woods, who says ‘A few weeks rest was quite sufficient to satiate a man of energetic habits like Julian, so he accepted an engagement as sub-Editor and reporter on the “Adelaide Times”… His pen pictures were always pleasant reading, whether he compelled attention by graphic description, made one laugh by the charm of his wit and keen sense of the comic, or shed tears over the sympathetic.  But the old yearning towards the church asserted itself anew…

Not succeeding in finding another opportunity of entering religion and being weary of ‘Hope deferred, that maketh the heart sick’ Julian sought some relaxation in society.  He was young, good-looking and very attractive; more than one fair lady bestowed upon him approving glances and many a pleasant hour was spent in music and singing among those who delighted in his company…

In conversation, someone mentioned him, stating that he intended returning to England to re-enter the Passionist Order.

‘Oh no,’ said another, ‘he will soon forget those fancies.  What does a fine young fellow like him want going about bare-footed? He should get married – there is Miss Z… breaking her heart about him.’ …

Some of the remarks at last reached the subject of them.  A tempter whispered, ‘Why not settle down?  You could do so much good here….it will do no harm to address the lady – you know she likes you.’

He certainly knew he was not disagreeable to her; and as he was invited to spend an evening at her home, some distance from the city, he determined he would on that occasion decide the important matter.

Father Julian Tenison Woods

When the appointed evening came, it brought a grand thunderstorm: heavy rain deluged the streets and made going out an impossibility. After waiting a considerable time for the rain to cease, the thought occurred to the young man – ‘It is not the will of God for me to go there.’  When too late to attempt going, the storm cleared away and a beautiful night set in… ‘I will pay a visit to the church,’ said Julian… kneeling before the altar he prayed for help and light, and at last arose comforted… this was the turning point of his life…

The Bishop, the saintly Dr Murphy, saw him…He came forward and spoke. In a conversation that followed, Julian placed entire confidence in the Bishop who advised him to give up the idea of the religious life at present and retire to the Jesuit College at Sevenhill near Clare to finish his studies preparatory to his ordination as a secular priest.  This he did, though not without a pang, for the religious life was his special attraction…

His departure from Adelaide caused no small surprise to his friends and Miss Z… had the satisfaction of knowing that no human being was preferred to her.


This extract is taken from:

Chapter 4th of Julian Tenison Woods: A Life has been used with the kind permission of the Trustees of the Sisters of Saint Joseph 1997 and the publishers, St Paul’s Publications.

If you would like to read the full text, including an informative Introduction, footnotes and an index, this book is available online and from some Mary MacKillop Centres.

For locations and contact details visit the Josephite Books webpage.


Carmel Jones rsj

Ego to Eco Webinar

Sr Mary Cresp has created a webinar titled ‘Ego to Eco’ which consists of four parts.

You’re invited to watch the webinar below:

Part 1: Introduction

Part 2: Connectivity and Diversity

Part 3: Speciation, Habitat & Adaption

Part 4: Evolution

Ego to Eco: Part Four

Father Julian Tenison Woods was a Catholic priest who had made a great contribution to Australian Geology, Botany, Palaeontology and Zoology.

Today the ecology of the Earth is suffering. Pope Francis states that we are in a time where peoples of the world need to have an ‘ecological conversion.’

Although Father Julian had lived in a different time to us, he had recognised the importance of looking after the Earth.

In recognition of the great ecological wisdom of Father Julian, Sr Mary Cresp has created a webinar titled ‘Ego to Eco’ which consists of four parts. In watching the webinar, we can look to Father Julian as a model for ‘ecological conversion.’

You’re invited to watch the fourth and last part of the webinar below:

Evolution

 

View all the webinar videos here

Julian Tenison Woods: A Life – Chapters 2nd & 3rd

Chapters 2nd & 3rd

After the death of Mrs Woods the family returned to England, and within a short time, Julian was taken into the establishment of the Times. He did not remain there long. Though gifted with great literary power, as his writings in later life prove, his tastes and tendencies took another direction…Mary MacKillop
Mary MacKillop, 1871

He had become acquainted with the Rev. Francis Oakley, who had charge of the Catholic Chapel and Schools at Islington, London… Under Canon Oakley, he took partial charge of one of the schools in the suburbs, for the children of the better classes… He remained in this position about a year and a half…

Canon Oakley introduced Julian to the Honorable and Reverend Geo. Spencer, who at the time was making a sensation as Father Ignatius, the Passionist Missionary… What an attractive figure, what a charming example he must have appeared to the young teacher, then eighteen, with his yearnings for a higher spiritual life – how he must have longed to follow such a leader… It seemed a most natural conclusion when Julian Woods left Canon Oakley’s school, and entered the Passionist Order, giving himself completely to its teachings and its practices, feeling satisfied that he had found his goal.

But it was not to be… He was not long with the Passionists when his health broke down; and after being removed from one house to another for change, without any permanent benefit, it was considered by those who had a right to judge that the austerities of the Order were greater than his constitution could bear…

Leaving his Order was a bitter disappointment to the fervent novice, but he cherished a firm hope that his departure was only a temporary one… he turned to the busy world, though he could not stifle his deep regret at leaving the peaceful Retreat – a lifelong regret from which he was never afterwards separated.

Change of climate was considered the best remedy for Julian’s ill-health. Accordingly, after remaining a short time in London, where he enjoyed the friendship of Father Faber, he was sent to France, and soon became one of the professors at the Toulon College for Naval Cadets. It was here that his taste for geology and natural science developed itself…

Father Julian Tenison Woods

He made the acquaintance of the Marist Fathers… Mr Woods was not quite twenty-one when he entered the Marist Novitiate at Mont Bel… he was doomed to another disappointment; or rather, we may say he was intended for a different work…

Mr Woods became acquainted with Dr Willson, at that time on a visit to Europe…the good Bishop thought the time had come to make a venture in the cause he had so much at heart, the forming of a seminary as the foundation of a proper system of Catholic Education in the diocese [of the Island of Tasmania]…  now that he must again withdraw from a religious life he had some conversation with the Bishop on the subject. The result was that, after spending a few months in his brother’s house in London, he bade farewell to Europe and sailed with Dr Willson in the ‘Berenicia’ on 15 October 1854 for Hobarton.

His brother, Mr J.D. Woods, had gone out to Australia two years earlier and was settled in Adelaide.  Another brother, Edward, was preparing to go to Port Philip where the great goldfields had attracted a large population… But none of these things was the magnet which drew Julian Woods to the Southern Hemisphere.

The wide field of Missionary enterprise spread out before his view including schools, where along with the daily study of all that is best in secular education, children should be trained to know their religion thoroughly, and practise it properly…


This extract is taken from:

Chapters 2nd and 3rd of Julian Tenison Woods: A Life have been used with the kind permission of the Trustees of the Sisters of Saint Joseph 1997 and the publishers, St Paul’s Publications.

If you would like to read the full text, including an informative Introduction, footnotes and an index, this book is available online and from some Mary MacKillop Centres.

For locations and contact details visit the Josephite Books webpage.


Carmel Jones rsj

Ego to Eco: Part Three

Father Julian Tenison Woods was a Catholic priest who had made a great contribution to Australian Geology, Botany, Palaeontology and Zoology.

Today the ecology of the Earth is suffering. Pope Francis states that we are in a time where peoples of the world need to have an ‘ecological conversion.’

Although Father Julian had lived in a different time to us, he had recognised the importance of looking after the Earth.

In recognition of the great ecological wisdom of Father Julian, Sr Mary Cresp has created a webinar titled ‘Ego to Eco’ which consists of four parts. In watching the webinar, we can look to Father Julian as a model for ‘ecological conversion.’

You’re invited to watch the third part of the webinar below:

Speciation, Habitat & Adaption

 

View Parts 1 and 2 here

Julian Tenison Woods: A Life – Chapter 1st

Chapter 1st

It would seem fitting that a wiser head and a more practised hand should undertake to write the life of Father Tenison Woods. Perhaps a noble work on the subject may yet be produced: meantime, it is a ‘Labor of love’ to draw this unpretending sketch, which will have one great advantage – it will be strictly authentic… Mary MacKillop
Mary MacKillop, 1871

The Rev. J.E.T. Woods was born in West Square, Southwark, London, on 15 November, 1832. He was the sixth son and seventh child of Mr James Dominick Woods, Q.C. and F.S.A. of the Middle Temple (and of Sydenham Kent), Barrister at law – and Henrietta Marie St Eloy Tenison, fourth daughter of the Rev. Joseph Tenison, Rector of Donoughmore Glebe, in the county of Wicklow, Ireland, and deputy governor and justice of the peace in the same county. The Rev. Joseph Tenison was son of the Bishop of Ossory, and grand nephew of Thomas Tenison, Archbishop of Canterbury.

Mr Woods was married to Miss Tenison at the Church of St George in the East, on 16 August 1819. Mr Woods’ father was a ship owner and wine merchant in the city of Cork, Ireland.

When Julian Woods was born, his father (who occupied a leading position on the literary staff of the Times newspaper) was absent from England..and did not see his infant son for nearly four months. Soon after the father’s return, the baby was baptised by the Rev. John White. The infant received the names of Julian Edmund Tenison. He certainly inherited his mother’s kindness; and seems to have had a special love for priests..

Father Julian Tenison Woods

At the age of four, Julian was sent to a lady’s school with his only sister, four years his senior – proud to take care of her little brother. He remained at this school (which was conducted by a Catholic lady – Miss Rose) two or three years; and after leaving it was taught at home for some considerable time. He was then sent to an ordinary day school, not far from his father’s residence, where he remained until about ten years of age.

Like many other distinguished men and noted characters, Julian E. Woods in his infancy and early boyhood was in no way remarkable. But what he learned, he learned well, and never forgot..As a child he was loving, generous, and considerate in the extreme. He was very sensitive, but of a trusting and affectionate nature. He was endowed with a sweet temper, and a most forgiving disposition..

About the age of ten, he was placed in the preparatory school at Kent House, Hammersmith, then carried on by Mr Thomas Hunt, where some of his brothers had been and others were being educated. This school was intended for Catholics only…

Julian remained about four years in Kent House School; then he was removed in consequence of ill health.

After remaining at home awhile, Julian was sent to Newington Grammar School in Surrey, where he remained about two years..

About this time his mother’s health gave cause for great anxiety, and in the hope that a change might be beneficial to her, Mr Woods removed with her and the junior members of the family to the island of Jersey. They remained there eighteen months; but nothing could restore the health of the good lady, who passed away peacefully on 5 November 1847.


This extract is taken from:

Chapter 1st of Julian Tenison Woods: A Life and has been used with the kind permission of the Trustees of the Sisters of Saint Joseph 1997 and the publishers, St Paul’s Publications.

If you would like to read the full text, including an informative Introduction, footnotes and an index, this book is available online and from some Mary MacKillop Centres.

For locations and contact details visit the Josephite Books webpage.


Carmel Jones rsj

Ego to Eco: Part Two

Father Julian Tenison Woods was a Catholic priest who had made a great contribution to Australian Geology, Botany, Palaeontology and Zoology.

Today the ecology of the Earth is suffering. Pope Francis states that we are in a time where peoples of the world need to have an ‘ecological conversion.’

Although Father Julian had lived in a different time to us, he had recognised the importance of looking after the Earth.

In recognition of the great ecological wisdom of Father Julian, Sr Mary Cresp has created a webinar titled ‘Ego to Eco’ which consists of four parts. In watching the webinar, we can look to Father Julian as a model for ‘ecological conversion.’

You’re invited to watch the second part of the webinar below:

Connectivity and Diversity

View Part 1 here